Trevor’s Travel Trivia – Part VI

  Papua New Guinea Travel Trivia   Papua New Guinea covers the eastern half of the world’s second-largest island, New Guinea, in the southwest Pacific. Greenland ranks #1, Borneo #3, and Great Britain #9. The western half of the island belongs to Indonesia. There is only one country with higher rainfall, the tiny Sao Tome and Principe. You thought it rains a lot in Old Blighty? Well, it rains more than 2.5 times as much in PNG. It is sunny most of the time (PNG ranks similar to Australia in terms of hours of bright sunshine per year), but when it rains, you better take out your snorkel and put on your wetsuit. PNG gained independence from Australia in 1975. The north-eastern part of the archipelago used to be a German colony. PNG’s head of state is Queen Elizabeth II. Approximately 700 Papuan and Melanesian tribes live in the country, […]

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Trevor’s Travel Trivia – Part V

    World’s Most Dangerous Food   -1- Fugu. Also known as the puffer fish, fugu is a Japanese delicacy that if not prepared correctly can kill you or cause asphyxia. The fish, normally eaten raw, can only be served by highly trained chefs with years of experience in preparing fugu. This is because its internal organs contain the lethal poison tetrodotoxin. This substance is 1,200 times more toxic than cyanide. Chefs leave a tiny amount inside the fish, which provides for a slight tingling sensation. Some consider the liver the tastiest part, but it is also the most poisonous, and serving this organ in restaurants was banned in Japan in 1984. In November 2011 a chef at two-Michelin star “Fugu Fukuji” in Tokyo was suspended from his post. The chef served fugu liver to a customer who, despite being warned of the risks, specifically asked that it be provided. […]

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Trevor’s Travel Trivia – Part IV

  Travel   Longest journey by taxi: Leigh Purnell, Paul Archer and Johno Ellison left Covent Garden on February 17, 2011 and travelled 43,319 miles around the globe, returning on May 11, 2012, in a 1992 LTI Fairway FX4 London black cab. They clocked up £79,006.80 on the meter. Most countries visited on a single tank of fuel: Audi breaks Guinness World Records record: The RAC and Audi have set a world record title by driving to 14 countries on a single tank of fuel; motoring journalist Andrew Frankel and racing driver Rebecca Jackson drove an Audi A6 ultra 1,158.9 miles almost non-stop for nearly 28 hours from the Netherlands to Hungary, passing through Belgium, Luxembourg, France, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany, Italy, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Serbia, thus setting the new world record for the most countries visited on a single tank of fuel. Most national capital cities visited in […]

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Trevor’s Travel Trivia – Part III

  Albania   Mother Teresa was born on 26 August 1910 in Skopje (modern Macedonia), then part of the Ottoman Empire. Her family was from Shkodër, Albania, and her father was involved in Albanian politics. She won the Nobel Peace Prize and is scheduled to become a Roman Catholic saint in September 2016. Tirana’s international airport is named after her. King Zog of Albania was the only national leader in modern times to return fire during an assassination attempt. When Geraldine Apponyi married King Zog in 1938 she became the first American woman to be a queen. The Ghegs of northern Albania are the only tribal society that survived in Europe until the middle of the 20th century. Albania had 3 million people but only 3000 cars at the end of the communist era in 1991 because private cars were illegal. Today, Albania has many cars and perhaps half of […]

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Trevor’s Travel Trivia – Part II

  German Travel Trivia   German cuisine is all about meat and sausages? Nope, according to Wikipedia Germany’s meat consumption per person is a mere 82kg per annum, still roughly 30 times more than in Bhutan or Bangladesh, but nothing much compared with the 125kg gobbled down in the U.S. or the 146kg eaten by the citizens of world-leading Denmark. If you ask a German the time and are told “halb drei” (literally “half three”) the time is in fact half past two (half two in English). Germans count the minutes to the next hour rather than after. Germany has (once) lost a penalty shootout in a major football competition. It was in 1976 when the then West Germany lost a shootout 5-3 in in the European Championships against Czechoslovakia. On the other occasions the Germans have been involved in one, they won. The “TV station Paul Nipkov” was a […]

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