Review: David Hockney Exhibition, Tate Britain

We’ve just returned from a late-night viewing (9-10pm) of the David Hockney Exhibition at Tate Britain and were heavily impressed of this exhibition of one of the major contributors to the pop art movement, who is considered to be one of the most influential and maybe the best-known amongst British artists of the 20th century. Old Blightey owes Hockney (who declined a knighthood earlier in his life). In the 1960s, this man, with his peroxide hair, big glasses, and awkward Yorkshire manner, was the first British artist who used television extensively, communicating to a broad audience at a time when most people in this country were completely oblivious to contemporary art. “What an artist is trying to do for people is bring them closer to something, because of course art is about sharing. You wouldn’t be an artist unless you wanted to share an experience, a thought.” David Hockney The […]

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RA Lates: New Soviet World

The Royal Academy of Arts hosted another great RA Lates event on Saturday night.  It was themed on the “Revolution: Russian Art, 1917-1932” exhibition, which is on at the RA until 17 April 2017.   There were actors, playing the role of Bolsheviks and Soviet Commissars, and the curious paying guests, like myself, eager to take part in the “immersive” experience.   And it was an experience. The queuing, the stamping of coupons, the bureaucracy, the “Biomechanical” life drawing class, the rubbery sausages in the communal dining hall at Canteen No. 57.  But we forgot all this as we were treated with a live balalaika performance…    and of course, the telling art of the revolutionary new Soviet world.         Next event: I look forward to the next RA Lates event, taking place on 22 April on the theme of America Dreaming. RA Lates: New Soviet World certainly was a blast. If we have whetted […]

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Manhattan Swing at the Royal Academy

We love the Royal Academy of Art and we try to do as many RA Lates as we can, this one not being the first one. It was called “Manhattan Swing” and aimed to emulate the 1940s and 1950s Manhattan of “abstract artists and beatniks in downtown Manhattan, Peggy Guggenheim and her new gallery Art of this Century, cocktail parties on the Upper East Side, Pollock’s drip paintings, jazz, beat poetry, dancing the jitterbug and sipping Martinis at the Savoy as we celebrate the era when New York overtook Paris as the capital of the art world.” The programme reads absolutely fabulous, ranging from intellectual talks and discussions about relevant topics such as “The Bohemia Incubator: Greenwich Village & Manhattan Post-War Culture” to Beat Poetry readings, live jazz music, DJs, free face painting, dance classes and painting workshops.       The lobby was turned into a dance floor, two bars, […]

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The Other Art Fair

We went to The Other Art Fair near Holborn today and liked it. It’s the UK’s largest fair to meet and buy art direct from emerging and undiscovered artists, basically cutting out the art galleries. It was much bigger and more professionally presented than expected. The artists were usually standing next to their artwork and more than happy to explain their art in any detail, including the techniques and materials used, their own inspiration and how it relates to their previous and other artists’ work, and so on. We particularly liked the more pop-arty stuff and some of the excellent photography. If you’re planning to check it out, too: They’ll be back to London Town, this time at Old Truman Brewery, to be precise, from 6-9 October 2016.

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Painting Gardens: Monet to Matisse, RA

We are usually not such fans of paintings of greenery, vegetables and flowers, even though, we do, of course, like the few famous garden paintings as much as anyone else. It’s just that for the most part, we prefer a bit more variety in motifs, so our expectations weren’t too high, when we arrived for this latest exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts. [foogallery id=”869″] But how wrong could we have been! The exhibition is absolutely magnificent and if you like art you must go. Full stop. It’s so beautifully curated and well-balanced, and even where the artists are (in quite a few of the cases) not from the top-five of their era, the paintings that were chosen of their oeuvre are always exactly right, for one reason or another: to highlight one aspect of the expression sought by artists of that time, or maybe to highlight a technique […]

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