‘Being Modern’ Exhibition: MoMA at Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris

During a recent trip to Paris, we finally made it to the much talked about MoMA exhibition at our beloved Fondation Louis Vuitton. Masterpieces of Max Beckmann, Alexander Calder, Paul Cézanne, Marcel Duchamp, Edward Hopper, Jasper Johns, Frida Kahlo, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Gustav Klimt, Roy Lichtenstein, Pablo Picasso, Man Ray, Paul Signac, Andy Warhol, and several dozen further artists were included.      The exhibition followed a timeline and opened with MoMA’s first decade. Works included Hopper’s famous House by the Railroad, Cézanne’s The Bather, up to post-war works from Pollock (Echo: Number 25) and de Kooning (Woman I).   The next section was perhaps my favourite one and focused on Minimalism and Pop art.    The third and last section, located on the top floor of the magnificent building, focused on contemporary works from around the world, most of which were acquired by MoMA in the last two years. […]

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Selfie to Self-Expression – Saatchi Gallery – our Review

We’ve just returned from a visit to this fabulous exhibition at the Saatchi Gallery. According to its brochure, “From Selfie to Self-Expression” is “the world’s first exhibition exploring the history of the selfie from the old masters to the present day, and celebrates the creative potential of a form of expression often derided for its inanity”. The first room shows self-portraits of Rembrandt, Edvard Munch, Picasso, Matisse and many of the other greats on i-Phone shaped large electronic displays with actual i-Phones to their bottom right-hand side, showing the Greats’ made-up Instagram profiles with 34,146 likes on the Picasso selfie, and so on. Hilarious. The whole things spreads over three floors, and it gets even better, the further you progress through the many rooms filled with exhibits.                                  We were particularly fond of the exhibit in Gallery 3: “Hello World! […]

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Pink Floyd Exhibition: Mortal Remains review

Let me state at the beginning: I’m not a Pink Floyd fan. If you are, then by all means go now and you’ll have a brilliant time. Should you go if you are not a fan? I guess, go ahead, if you think it might be for you and if you don’t mind the excessive admission price. The slogan of the exhibition is “Experience a spectacular and unparalleled audio-visual journey through Pink Floyd’s unique and extraordinary worlds, chronicling the music, design and staging of the band, from their debut in the 1960s through to the present day.” I’m not convinced that there is anything spectacular or unparalleled about the audio-visual journey. The exhibition uses more multi-media and innovative presentation methods than your average exhibition of – say – Rembrandt paintings, but in terms of innovation I wouldn’t give it more than 5 out of 10. Nearly everything that is cool […]

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Review: David Hockney Exhibition, Tate Britain

We’ve just returned from a late-night viewing (9-10pm) of the David Hockney Exhibition at Tate Britain and were heavily impressed of this exhibition of one of the major contributors to the pop art movement, who is considered to be one of the most influential and maybe the best-known amongst British artists of the 20th century. Old Blightey owes Hockney (who declined a knighthood earlier in his life). In the 1960s, this man, with his peroxide hair, big glasses, and awkward Yorkshire manner, was the first British artist who used television extensively, communicating to a broad audience at a time when most people in this country were completely oblivious to contemporary art. “What an artist is trying to do for people is bring them closer to something, because of course art is about sharing. You wouldn’t be an artist unless you wanted to share an experience, a thought.” David Hockney The […]

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Our Favourite Paris District: Le Marais

Even though we usually stay in Saint-Germain, when visiting Paris, our favourite part of town is Le Marais (“The Marsh”), the former Jewish quarter, and prior to that the home of the high nobility. We always spend at least a couple of hours sitting on a park bench or (in summer) on the lawn of Place des Vosges, the oldest planned square of the city, dating from 1612. Originally named Place Royale, it was a popular meeting point for the nobility and one of the most fashionable and expensive squares until the Revolution, when most of the nobility moved to the Faubourg Saint-Germain district, just west of Saint-Germain-des-Prés. Today, the vaulted arcades house some of Paris’ best art galleries (such as Modus), cool cafes, a lovely perfume shop, and more.    We love the relaxed, laid-back, bohemian atmosphere of the Marais with its many young people, hip fashion shops, and, […]

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