Ai Weiwei Exhibition at the RA

We went to the Ai Weiwei Exhibition at the Royal Academy of Art in October 2015 and were heavily impressed. We had been fans for some time, but the exhibition brought his art a lot closer with the large number of his top works and the information that was provided with it.      One of China’s most influential artists, Ai became widely known in Britain after his sunflower seeds installation in Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in 2010, which was also the first time we realised what league he was playing in and we followed him more closely since then, nearly exclusively through the media.      We both always liked political art, art that isn’t just decorative or artistic, but that has something more important to say, art that tries to change society and not just change art, art that is angry in a creative, inspiring, idealistic way.      Ai’s art […]

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Banksy’s Dismaland

We visited Banksy’s Dismaland in September 2015. We left London with the first outgoing Saturday train one weekend and spent the morning and most of the afternoon in Bath, then took the train from there to Weston-super-Mare. Dismaland is located next to the Seaquarium in the former Tropicana Park. Apparently Banksy got the idea of using the area for an exhibition when he peeked into the abandoned and derelict park through a broken fence in January 2015 and started preparations for the exhibition shortly thereafter.      We thought the exhibition was great. Very political, not necessarily in line with our political views, but angry art is always good art, and angry this art was. The queues were very long and once we finally got to the front, we realised that the admission procedure was already part of the show. The doormen and women were incredibly rude and aggressive, pushing people […]

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Nuremberg, The Emperor’s Favourite City

Having grown up in Bavaria (of which Nuremberg is a part), Germany, I had been to Nuremberg more than once, but I only really got to know this Frankonian gem some ten years after I had relocated to London. Through work I took over a 2.5-months assignment there from June to August 2015 and I had a great time.           It was the hottest summer in decades with temperatures north of 40 Celsius over weeks in a row, bit too hot for my taste, but still, overall I loved the sunny, hot weather.           I stayed at a hotel that was equidistant to the central station (from where the subway only takes 12 minutes to the international airport), the office, and old town: 5 minutes each. In London my wife and I are usually feeling lucky if the commute is less than 45 minutes.           I hadn’t […]

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Hiking and Relaxing at the Jurassic Coast

We went to the Jurassic Coast in August 2015. We took the train from London to Weymouth (direct trains, 2h40m) where a rental car was waiting for us. We started our tour with a ten minute car ride to nearby Isle of Portland, a tied island that is connected to the mainland by a road. The road sits on Chesil Beach, a barrier beach, separated from the coast by a lagoon, which stretches much further West and which we’d have on our left for a good while longer on our way to Lyme Regis later that day.      The famous Portland stone that originates from the local quarries has been used worldwide for landmark buildings such as St. Paul’s Cathedral in London or the U.N. Headquarters in New York. Portland Harbour, between Weymouth and Portland, is one of the largest man-made harbours in the world. Until 1995 it was used […]

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Cotswolds – Our Favourite London Weekend Trip Destination

We can’t remember when we’ve been to the Cotswolds for the first time. At the time of writing we have both been living in London for more than ten years and intend to stay for good, it’s now our chosen home town, but it took us at least 3 years or so before we discovered the very best local weekend trip destination just an hour and a half away from London Paddington by train (hop off at Moreton-in-Marsh) and a similar amount of time by car.           The Cotswolds are usually considered to stretch from Stratford-upon-Avon in the north-east to Bath in the south-west about 145km away from Stratford, covering a strip of land about 45 to 90km wide (roughly between Cheltenham/Gloucester and Oxford) belonging to six English counties: mainly Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire, as well as parts of Wiltshire, Somerset, Worcestershire and Warwickshire. The highest point of the hilly […]

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