Trevor’s Travel Trivia – Part V

  World’s Most Dangerous Food   (1) Fugu Also known as the puffer fish, fugu is a Japanese delicacy that if not prepared correctly can kill you or cause asphyxia. The fish, normally eaten raw, can only be served by highly trained chefs with years of experience in preparing fugu. This is because its internal organs contain the lethal poison tetrodotoxin. This substance is 1,200 times more toxic than cyanide. Chefs leave a tiny amount inside the fish, which provides for a slight tingling sensation. Some consider the liver the tastiest part, but it is also the most poisonous, and serving this organ in restaurants was banned in Japan in 1984. In November 2011 a chef at two-Michelin star “Fugu Fukuji” in Tokyo was suspended from his post. The chef served fugu liver to a customer who, despite being warned of the risks, specifically asked that it be provided. The […]

Continue Reading

Rumfest London – Taste the best Rums of this Planet

We got our tickets for London’s biggest and longest-standing rum trade fair through a competition by our much more established fellow blogger The Food Goblin (thanks, Lucy!). It’s normally not the kind of thing we’d do and the regular price of £50 would almost certainly have put us off. However, it turned out to be a great experience. The visitors were split evenly between hard-drinking party people who tried to get 250 pounds of value out of their ticket and professionals from the hospitality, food and beverage industry, who weren’t exactly holding back on the drinking, but kept it slightly more professional, at least some of them and until later in the afternoon. It was a pleasant, fun atmosphere and we didn’t encounter anything beyond a few people being a bit loud and unsteady on their feet, which is fine in our book. Up until today, I really only ever […]

Continue Reading

Manhattan Swing at the Royal Academy

We love the Royal Academy of Art and we try to do as many RA Lates as we can, this one not being the first one. It was called “Manhattan Swing” and aimed to emulate the 1940s and 1950s Manhattan of “abstract artists and beatniks in downtown Manhattan, Peggy Guggenheim and her new gallery Art of this Century, cocktail parties on the Upper East Side, Pollock’s drip paintings, jazz, beat poetry, dancing the jitterbug and sipping Martinis at the Savoy as we celebrate the era when New York overtook Paris as the capital of the art world.” The programme reads absolutely fabulous, ranging from intellectual talks and discussions about relevant topics such as “The Bohemia Incubator: Greenwich Village & Manhattan Post-War Culture” to Beat Poetry readings, live jazz music, DJs, free face painting, dance classes and painting workshops.       The lobby was turned into a dance floor, two bars, […]

Continue Reading

Watch a king have Posh ‘n’ Becks and an ingénue make it big

We watched The Libertine starring Dominic Cooper yesterday at the Haymarket Theatre Royal, Stephen Jefferys’ 1994 play portraying the life of John Wilmot, second Earl of Rochester, a real-life historic figure who would make Russell Brand blush, and who was previously portrayed by Johnny Depp (with John Malkovich and Rosamund Pike) in the homonymous 2004 movie.    We hadn’t been back to the Her Majesty’s (its former name) in a while, not since watching Waiting for Godot with Patrick Stewart and Sir Ian McKellen a while back. As always, it’s such a beautiful atmosphere and we loved the stage design, so stylish, and none of that abstract indulgence in geometric forms, patterns, and light effects, we’ve seen too often in recent years.    You watch the Earl sleep with a myriad of women or enjoy blow-jobs, on one occasion while his friend the king has sex on a balcony next […]

Continue Reading

Ginger Plants – Yum and Good for You

We’ve been great fans of ginger, turmeric and cardamom for as long as we can think back. We love the taste of these roots and their enormous health effects. All three are from the family of ginger plants. Cardamom is from the seeds of the Cardamom plant, ginger and turmeric are both roots. The plants are widely used in India and other parts of Asia. Most recipes we know do not involve combinations of the three (or two of the) spices, but contain just one of the three. We find ourselves occasionally combining ginger and turmeric for some Asian chicken dishes, and ginger and cardamom for masala teas or when baking.       My personal favourite is ginger. I literally can’t imagine life without it. Once a week or so I buy a whole kilogram of ginger at the corner store (some of the Costcutter corner stores have top quality […]

Continue Reading