Watch a king have Posh ‘n’ Becks and an ingénue make it big

We watched The Libertine starring Dominic Cooper yesterday at the Haymarket Theatre Royal, Stephen Jefferys’ 1994 play portraying the life of John Wilmot, second Earl of Rochester, a real-life historic figure who would make Russell Brand blush, and who was previously portrayed by Johnny Depp (with John Malkovich and Rosamund Pike) in the homonymous 2004 movie.    We hadn’t been back to the Her Majesty’s (its former name) in a while, not since watching Waiting for Godot with Patrick Stewart and Sir Ian McKellen a while back. As always, it’s such a beautiful atmosphere and we loved the stage design, so stylish, and none of that abstract indulgence in geometric forms, patterns, and light effects, we’ve seen too often in recent years.    You watch the Earl sleep with a myriad of women or enjoy blow-jobs, on one occasion while his friend the king has sex on a balcony next […]

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Ginger Plants – Yum and Good for You

We’ve been great fans of ginger, turmeric and cardamom for as long as we can think back. We love the taste of these roots and their enormous health effects. All three are from the family of ginger plants. Cardamom is from the seeds of the Cardamom plant, ginger and turmeric are both roots. The plants are widely used in India and other parts of Asia. Most recipes we know do not involve combinations of the three (or two of the) spices, but contain just one of the three. We find ourselves occasionally combining ginger and turmeric for some Asian chicken dishes, and ginger and cardamom for masala teas or when baking.       My personal favourite is ginger. I literally can’t imagine life without it. Once a week or so I buy a whole kilogram of ginger at the corner store (some of the Costcutter corner stores have top quality […]

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Pork Belly from Hell

Our blog seems to be drifting more and more into pork, this being the third recent post about pig meat, but it had to be done. I had a business meeting with an old acquaintance of mine from the U.S. near London Bridge for lunch yesterday, and thought might as well make use of the TasteCard, which gives you a discount of 50% at some 7,000 or so restaurants in London (many of which are chains like Pizza Express, but some are decent restaurants, we do not get any favours from TasteCard to recommend them).   The Brigade in an old fire station in Tooley Street, with a top 10% rating on Tripadvisor, caught my eye and I made a reservation. The atmosphere and service are on the right side of the pleasantness scale and our food arrived quickly, after just 10 minutes. We had both ordered pork belly as […]

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CREAM Café – Chillaxed atmosphere and good vibes

I tried out CREAM Café in Shoreditch today for a late breakfast, more by accident than by occasion. A business partner had stood me up and I was in the area and felt hungry, so went into the first best place around. The atmosphere is very pleasant, with cool music (this morning: 1980s heavy metal and hard rock, on other occasions it’s different music apparently), lots of space, pot plants, nice-enough décor, and an abundance of plugs to plug in your laptop. I ordered Sweet Potatoes with Spinach and Red Lentils, which came with a mix of herbs, bit like pesto, that were thickened and contained a pleasant amount of vinegar and olive oil. Very large portion and quite tasty. I made the mistake of ordering my latte with almond milk, just to try something new. I presume it’s the almond milk, but the texture of my latte was not […]

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Beyond Caravaggio – An Explosion of Light and Darkness

After our visit to Picasso’s Portraits exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery, we thought, might as well, and despite us both not being very much into Renaissance art (we’re more into the late 19th, 20th and 21st century), we enjoyed the ‘Beyond Caravaggio’ exhibition at the National Gallery very much.      As one would expect form the National Gallery, the exhibition is beautifully curated and instead of focussing on Caravaggio’s work itself, it shows how he influenced his art in Europe for the two or three decades following his death, how other painters were influenced by him and – starting out from his work – created great art in their own right, in many cases greater than his art.      It was inspiring to see how Caravaggio (among others, of course, but this was not the point of the exhibition in question) purged the flatness and one-dimensionality, the awkward false […]

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